[Trombone-l] Double Buzz remedies?

dslide13@aol.com dslide13 at aol.com
Sun Sep 10 11:27:29 CDT 2006


 If there are two notes, there are two buzzing points. It makes sense that the second buzz would buzz an octave or a fifth since those notes are also available in the same position. It isn't some kind of sympathetic vibration or broken harmonic. It is multiple apertures.
 
 I practice focusing my buzz/aperture by making a narrow "V" with my first two fingers. I put the fingers gently to my chops while using the "V" to frame my aperture. I free buzz this way until the center of my embouchure is my aperture. Thinking of the letter "P" helps me place the buzzing point. When I have found the correct balance and tension and the center of the top lip is supple enough to buzz, I experiment with a narrower "V" from the fingers. I remove each finger one at a time and replace it to see if I can hold the aperture in the center without the dampening of the outer embouchure by the fingers. When I feel confident that I can do that, I remove both fingers and continue the air in hopes of holding the aperture there. 
 
 While playing, my aperture may begin to move left or right. I use left and right mouthpiece pressure in the same way that I use the fingers in the excercise. I try to coax the buzz back to the center. 
 
 I think of the top lip as being divided into a series of narrow columns. If all of these narrow columns are tender, then I can relax my embouchure to use more of them(lower notes) or tighten my embouchure to only use the ones in the center(higher notes). If any of these columns is not tender due to chapped lips, dead skin, swelling or general stiffness, then it will create a dead spot in the lip. That dead spot is usually responsible for my double buzz. It becomes a divider so that two buzzing points develop. From there, I identify the dead spot and work at making it buzz. Once it's tenderized, I go back to forcing the aperture to the tiniest column in the center of my chops. 
 
 That dead spot in the lip is like a gasket that's dry and hard. It can no longer make the seal, so the air is sneaking out of an undesirable opening.
    David Gibson
 trombonist/educator
 www.jazzbone.org
 
 
 
    
 -----Original Message-----
 From: crtune at adelphia.net
 To: thetubameister at adelphia.net; dslide13 at aol.com
 Cc: trombone-l at samford.edu; trombone-l-bounces at server5.samford.edu
 Sent: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 3:52 PM
 Subject: Re: [Trombone-l] Double Buzz remedies?
 
  I like the two-points of contact idea. . .although I'm not sure I buy into that totally. Obviously this thing is rare. . .and it seems rarer when were in good shape, with our familar horn and everything is blowing right (no "fetid" wind off the swamp of "clams" is blowing in. . .). 
 
 Seems to me that the "two notes" are generally a note and it's fifth. . .or something similarly harmonic. . . .mebbe and octave. . .or a big huge fourth. 
 
 Isn't it possible that the whole system is now RESONANT at both the primary frequency AND it's fifth (octave and a fifth. . .probably). And the relative resonances happen to emphasize BOTH notes so that they can be heard. [if that is true, you may be able to nip this right out by suggesting strategic changes in the INSIDE of the mouth. . .depending upon exactly when this is happening--see also below, about the possibility of simply swapping out another horn to see what happens] 
 
 Since there is always a waveform for anything "sound". . .there is a waveform for a set of two notes added together like this. You can actually graph it using "sine" functions in a spreadsheet or other graphing tool. It usually looks like a steep sine, with a notch on the side and its symmetrical mate below the graph line. This is the dance the airpressure is "actually doing" and our ears and BRAINS hear it as a set of two notes played simultaneously. . .it is not hard to imagine an otherwise regular set of two lips vibrating this way. . .without anything very special going on. . .something is making the "signal" do this dance instead of the straight, single tone dance. 
 
 (even though the sound of two notes as a contiuous tone is simply a "wave form". . .thus K and JJ, during a held part of a tone were simply a "waveform". . .our ear/brain sets are so strong that they can also pick out over very quick time, all kinds of very detailed differences in transients and tonal shade changes over time that indicate that two separate musicians are playing . . .thus we hear the difference between a REAL ensemble like K&J, and a sample of a trb playing two voices). 
 
 Now. . I know that this effect causes the lip to "FEEL" weird. . .not used to the odd feeling. We've got lots of touch receptors in our lips. . .(babies really use these alot) and can feel each and every thing that happens in real time to those kissers. So we need to hitch this sensor array up to our mouth's sensors and the jaw position and the chest and lungs and get the right feel to produce accurate tones. This takes practice. 
 
 I think the thing to do is to have faith that our whole system will prevail if we pay attention to what were doing in each and every little way and also feel with our lips and listen and stay focused and relaxed and keep the practice up. You may occasionally run into a situation where a beginner is essentially setting up so that they always produce this sort of sound. In that case, a brief discussion of all this, together with the above embouchure/mouth interior changes and maybe a little switcheroo to a different horn for a little while will likely create a different, proper tone for 'em and then they can be switched back to their own horn and allowed to practice getting a right sound. 
 
 I spend lots and lots of time on decent sound in the early stages of teaching. You really have a harder time, when you have to go back and get a decent sound when you are already an advanced trombone player. Also, I think this stuff becomes more reliable and "money notes" come out when you want them to, if you work on basics really carefully from the beginning. 
 
 I know impatience can get in the way, so I adjust to each kid's personality, but we do what we need to, to keep interest and we get back to basics, until it is SECOND NATURE. . .then we plow ahead avidly. 
 
 Chris 
 
 
 ----- Original Message ----- From: <thetubameister at adelphia.net> 
 To: <dslide13 at aol.com> 
 Cc: "Bone List" <trombone-l at samford.edu>; <trombone-l-bounces at server5.samford.edu> 
 Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 3:53 PM 
 Subject: Re: [Trombone-l] Double Buzz remedies? 
 
 > My usual recommendation for the double buzz is to practice free-buzzing in > a mirror where you can see it. Then, experiment and adapt. Thinking too > hard without looking could prove disasterous. 
 > 
 > J.c.S. 
 > 
 > 
 > ---- dslide13 at aol.com wrote: 
 >> It's caused by two points of contact, or two apertures. Perhaps your >> point of contact for the buzz has gotten off center, but then the buzz >> starts again in the center. Or, maybe fatigue has caused you to lose your >> seal in the outer edges of your embouchure. 
 >> 
 >> I usually experiment with transfering pressure from left to right in an >> attempt to mute the unwanted buzzing and recenter my aperture. 
 >> 
 >> DG 
 >> Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless handheld 
 >> 
 >> -----Original Message----- 
 >> From: "Jeff Albert" <jeffalbert.smb at gmail.com> 
 >> Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2006 13:22:03 
 >> To:"Wayne Dyess" <texastbone at gt.rr.com> 
 >> Cc:Bone List <trombone-l at samford.edu> 
 >> Subject: Re: [Trombone-l] Double Buzz remedies? 
 >> 
 >> When it happens to me (which isn't often), it is when I am very tired. >> If I 
 >> pull the horn off my face for a second, it usually goes away. 
 >> 
 >> Jeff 
 >> 
 >> On 9/8/06, Wayne Dyess <texastbone at gt.rr.com> wrote: 
 >> > 
 >> > I just received this inquiry from a local band director. I have him 
 >> > my answer, but thought this is a topic worthy of discussion. 
 >> > 
 >> > Double buzz. 
 >> > 
 >> > How often do you see it? 
 >> > How does a student fix it? 
 >> > What causes it? 
 >> > 
 >> > 
 >> > 
 >> > Begin forwarded message: 
 >> > 
 >> > > what do I tell kids to do when they are getting a double buzz???? 
 >> > 
 >> > 
 >> > My first inclination was to suggest the kid switch to drums... the 
 >> > band director who sent in this question is a percussionist. 
 >> > Ha! 
 >> > 
 >> > 
 >> > 
 >> > Dr. Wayne Dyess, Professor of Trombone 
 >> > Lamar University 
 >> > P. O. Box 10044 
 >> > Beaumont, Texas 77710 
 >> > http://lamar.edu 
 >> > 
 >> > The Night & Day Orchestra 
 >> > http://ndotex.com 
 >> > 
 >> > 
 >> > _______________________________________________ 
 >> > Trombone-l mailing list 
 >> > Trombone-l at maillists.samford.edu 
 >> > http://maillists.samford.edu/mailman/listinfo/trombone-l 
 >> > 
 >> 
 >> 
 >> 
 >> -- >> www.jeffalbert.com 
 >> 
 >> www.scratchmybrain.com 
 >> 
 >> www.pepperenterprises.com 
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 > 
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